Feature

Embodied Self and Other

Aug 12th, 2016 | By

I am sharing the slides from my presentation at the 31st International Congress of Psychology, held this July in Yokohama, Japan–a Husserlian, phenomenological perspective on the intertwining of self and Other.  I draw primarily on Edmund Husserl’s genetic phenomenological account of the arising of the I in relation to a You, and I also dialogue with two founding

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The Divine in Husserl: Interview with Prof. Ales Bello

Mar 31st, 2015 | By

In March 2015 the University of San Francisco hosted an online program on the Divine in Husserl, introduced by Susi Ferrarello. In this interview Ales Bello, Emeritus Professor at Rome’s Lateran University, expounds her synthesis of the seven ways to God that she described more thoroughly in her 2005 book,  “The Divine in Husserl and Other Explorations.”

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Intentionality, Narrativity, Husserl & Ricoeur

Oct 25th, 2014 | By

My latest article in the Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology explores the psychological meanings of narratives through Husserl’s phenomenology in dialogue with Ricoeur’s hermeneutics. Ricoeur (1975) wrote, “On the one hand, hermeneutics is erected on the basis of phenomenology and thus preserves something of the philosophy from which it nevertheless differs: phenomenology remains the unsurpassable presupposition of hermeneutics. On the other

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Scott Churchill on phenomenology, empathy, and embodiment

Aug 26th, 2014 | By

Dr. Scott Churchill joined Dr. Ferrarello and myself to present a two-day seminar on Empathy, Phenomenology and Hermeneutics at Saybrook in August 2014. Dr. Churchill is Professor of Psychology at the University of Dallas, and Editor-in-Chief of The Humanistic Psychologist. We wanted to share a selection of his articles and a link to an interview with him

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Englander on Subjectivity, Memory, and Human Science

Jun 19th, 2014 | By

In this chapter Magnus Englander explores Subjectivity, Memory, and Human Science as part of a festschrift volume honoring Amedeo Giorgi.



Ferrarello on Sexuality and Metaphysics

Jun 16th, 2014 | By

“No one is saved and no one is totally lost.” (171) With these words Merleau-Ponty closes the section of his Phenomenology of Perception dedicated to the Body in its Sexual Being. Why should we feel lost or safe in relation to sexuality? And what does sexuality have to do with metaphysics? Merleau-Ponty and Husserl explain

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Ferrarello: Phenomenology as a psychological method

Jan 30th, 2014 | By

Dr. Ferrarello co-taught a graduate seminar in phenomenological psychology in January 2014 for doctoral students at Saybrook. She led students in a day-long reflection on the steps in qualitative data gathering and analysis which they had practiced during the preceding days, guiding their reflection on the meaning of the steps in the research process, and

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Philosophy & Psychology in Dialogue: Aalborg, Denmark

Sep 22nd, 2013 | By

Magnus Englander, Susi Ferrarello, and Marc Applebaum collaborated in presenting a panel, “Phenomenological Research: Philosophy and Psychology in Dialogue” at the 32nd annual International Human Science Research Conference in Aalborg, Denmark. Englander’s presentation was his reflection as a qualitative psychological researcher on philosophical proposals to phenomenologically “frontload” empirical experiments. He addressed philosophers Shaun Gallagher and

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Phenomenology as dialogue: A researcher’s reflection

Aug 1st, 2013 | By

The way we creatively embody and express the traditions we inherit, whether philosophical or psychological, is inevitably shaped by our own history, background, and values. In my case, before I began my study of phenomenology I had already worked as a teacher and counselor. I’ve been a teacher of one kind or another since I

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Ferrarello: The Last Concert of the Greek National Symphony Orchestra; or The Need to Become a Subject

Jun 22nd, 2013 | By

  It may be that to see yourself, it is not sufficient to look at yourself in a mirror, because you may not want to see yourself or, more likely, you aren’t able to see yourself as the subject of your seeing. It may be that you do not want to pay attention to those

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