Posts Tagged ‘ reduction ’

Phenomenology and empirical science

Dec 16th, 2012 | By

Since Husserl, phenomenological philosophers have dialogued with the empirical sciences in an attempt to contribute to a more complete human science—a science that speaks to the fullness of being human.  The job of our philosophers, in this context, is to invite an opening up of an epistemological conversation that renews the sciences’ exploration of human

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Ferrarello: Husserl, Intersubjectivity, and Lifeworld

Sep 19th, 2012 | By

 Introduction Intersubjectivity can be described as a relationship between me and an other. The peculiarity of this relationship lies in the fact that the other is not alien to me, but is “within me” in a way that his or her “otherness” can be investigated beginning with the way in which that “otherness” is imminent

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Key ideas: Applebaum on the phenomenological reduction

Sep 3rd, 2012 | By

I recently posted a short discussion of what “the natural attitude” means in Husserl’s phenomenology. As I mentioned, the natural attitude is the perspective of everyday life. For Husserl the process he calls the phenomenological reduction is the means by which the phenomenologist frees himself from the reifications of the natural attitude, gaining a standpoint

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How Phenomenologists Listen

Apr 23rd, 2012 | By

I teach and mentor graduate psychology students in Descriptive Phenomenological Psychology. Learning how to practice phenomenological research, students gain a lived-sense of the feature of consciousness that Edmund Husserl, drawing on the work of his teacher Franz Brentano, termed “intentionality”. Within Husserl’s phenomenology intentionality signifies (in part) that everything we can experience and know is

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