Posts Tagged ‘ Husserl ’

Moustakas’ Phenomenology: Husserlian?

Feb 6th, 2013 | By

Students new to phenomenological psychology often ask me what’s the difference between Clark Moustakas’ and Amedeo Giorgi’s research methods, since both approaches are called “phenomenological.” In fact there are major differences: in this post I’ll examine Moustakas’ Phenomenological Research Methods (1994) from the perspective of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological philosophy. Naturally I’ll also be speaking as

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Mohanty on Intentional Acts

Feb 2nd, 2013 | By

Reading J. N. Mohanty’s essay “Husserl’s Concept of Intentionality” in Analecta Husserliana I (1971), the following passage, discussing the Logische Untersuchungen, stood out to me: “The static analysis lays bare the structure of what is called an intentional act whereby the word ‘act’ has to be taken not in its ordinary usage as meaning an activity or a process, but

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Ferrarello: Introducing Phenomenological Philosophy to Psychologists

Jan 27th, 2013 | By

Dr. Susi Ferrarello opened our January 2013 graduate seminar on Descriptive Phenomenological Psychology with this introductory lecture–her aim was to acquaint Saybrook’s doctoral psychology students with the tradition of philosophical inquiry in which Husserl’s phenomenology is situated. You’ll see her presentation was a wide-ranging invitation to participate in the questioning that is the philosophical tradition–

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Broomé: Intentional Analysis in Psychological Research

Dec 23rd, 2012 | By

 Introduction The descriptive phenomenological method of psychological research is rooted in the intentional property of consciousness. Husserl (1983) modified Brentano’s concept of intentionality, expressing it as consciousness acting upon an object or state-of-affairs that is not itself. In other words, embodied human subjectivity relates actively and passively to things that are immanent and external to it

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What was it like to study with Husserl?

Oct 13th, 2012 | By

Philosopher Ludwig Landgrebe (1902-1991) was one of Husserl’s closest assistants. Landgrebe’s description of Husserl below was translated by Algis Mickunas, Professor Emeritus, Ohio University, and included by Lester Embree in his Representation of Edmund Husserl: “Almost everyone who first encountered Husserl experienced something of a disappointment at not immediately seeing any external signs of how

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The Phenomenology of Dreaming: A Dialogue

Oct 12th, 2012 | By

This conversation between philosopher Susi Ferrarello and me began, as is often the case in phenomenology, with an everyday experience: dreaming. My description of a dream led us to reflect on Merleau-Ponty’s discussions of dreaming and waking perception, and Husserl’s active and passive intentionality. The exchange continued over several weeks, and we’ve summarized it here–

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Ferrarello: Husserl, Intersubjectivity, and Lifeworld

Sep 19th, 2012 | By

 Introduction Intersubjectivity can be described as a relationship between me and an other. The peculiarity of this relationship lies in the fact that the other is not alien to me, but is “within me” in a way that his or her “otherness” can be investigated beginning with the way in which that “otherness” is imminent

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Key ideas: Applebaum on the phenomenological reduction

Sep 3rd, 2012 | By

I recently posted a short discussion of what “the natural attitude” means in Husserl’s phenomenology. As I mentioned, the natural attitude is the perspective of everyday life. For Husserl the process he calls the phenomenological reduction is the means by which the phenomenologist frees himself from the reifications of the natural attitude, gaining a standpoint

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Applebaum: Introducing Husserl’s phenomenology to psychology students

Aug 29th, 2012 | By

This PowerPoint presentation was developed for the first meeting of a seminar introducing psychology students to phenomenological psychological research, and assumes no prior knowledge of Husserl or continental philosophy. The descriptive phenomenological research method itself is introduced in depth over the course of the semester–this presentation is a “first taste” of Husserlian terms for students. Naturally, I added

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Key Ideas in Phenomenology: Applebaum on the Natural Attitude

Aug 18th, 2012 | By

This is the first in a series of our posts on central ideas in phenomenology—please add your observations, additions, or questions in the comments section! I’ll begin with what Husserl calls “the natural attitude.” In everyday life we see the objects of our experience such as physical objects, other people, and even ideas, as simply

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