Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005)

Lead

Intentionality, Narrativity, Husserl & Ricoeur

My latest article in the Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology explores the psychological meanings of narratives through Husserl’s phenomenology in dialogue with Ricoeur’s hermeneutics. Ricoeur (1975) wrote, “On the one hand, hermeneutics is erected on the basis of phenomenology and thus preserves something of the philosophy from which it nevertheless differs: phenomenology remains the unsurpassable presupposition of hermeneutics. On the other

[continue reading…]

Feature

Scott Churchill Scott Churchill on phenomenology, empathy, and embodiment

Dr. Scott Churchill joined Dr. Ferrarello and myself to present a two-day seminar on Empathy, Phenomenology and Hermeneutics at Saybrook in August 2014. Dr. Churchill is Professor of Psychology at the University of Dallas, and Editor-in-Chief of The Humanistic Psychologist. We wanted to share a selection of his articles and a link to an interview with him

[continue reading…]

image001 Infancy and the Self/Other Differentiation: Perspectives from Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis

Fellow phenomenologists, Please note this upcoming  conference at the Center for Subjectivity at the University of Copenhagen: Infancy and Self/Other Differentiation

Applebaum Invitation for feedback–a paper on method versus anti-method

  I invite our readers to participate in a conversation about method and anti-method in qualitative research. I’m posing the question this way–maybe polemically!–because if you reads the work of some qualitative writers, you might have the impression that the qualitative researcher is free to improvise at will, switch strategies, create their own process for data analysis on the

[continue reading…]

Magnus Englander Englander on Subjectivity, Memory, and Human Science

In this chapter Magnus Englander explores Subjectivity, Memory, and Human Science as part of a festschrift volume honoring Amedeo Giorgi.

folded hands Ferrarello on Sexuality and Metaphysics

“No one is saved and no one is totally lost.” (171) With these words Merleau-Ponty closes the section of his Phenomenology of Perception dedicated to the Body in its Sexual Being. Why should we feel lost or safe in relation to sexuality? And what does sexuality have to do with metaphysics? Merleau-Ponty and Husserl explain

[continue reading…]

Human Science

Scheler Scheler, Merleau-Ponty, and “Essences”

  “It is one thing to sift the data of inner observation conceptually and to set them up as compounds, then to decompose these into ultimate ‘simple’ elements and to study through artificial variation by observation and experiment, the conditions and results of such combinations. It is quite another to describe and understand the units

[continue reading…]

Abstract painting Beyond Scientism and Relativism

Here is a link to my contribution to the festschrift  celebrating Amedeo Giorgi’s career in phenomenological psychology. I pose the question: why should the scientific status of our work be a compelling issue for the next generation of qualitative psychological researchers?  I explore the criteria for science proposed by Giorgi, and discuss van Manen’s hermeneutic

[continue reading…]

Dr. Rodger Broomé What does a phenomenological psychological dissertation method chapter look like?

Here’s an example of a phenomenological dissertation method chapter. This paper is the methodology section of Broomé’s doctoral dissertation that outlines the Descriptive Phenomenological Psychological Method of research as taught by Amedeo P. Giorgi. Giorgi (2009) based his method on Husserl’s descriptive phenomenological philosophy as an alternative epistemology for human science research. This method section

[continue reading…]

Socrates “Do I really need to read all this philosophy?”

The students who put this question to me are usually taking their first course in phenomenological or hermeneutic (narrative) psychological research. And in a way, I feel for them, because many of them didn’t expect to be facing something called “epistemology,” and bumping into any number of arcane Greek terms that seem to bear no

[continue reading…]

Amedeo Giorgi Amedeo Giorgi: A Life in Phenomenology

In August 2011 Amedeo Giorgi was interviewed at Saybrook’s graduate conference on themes related to his life’s work in phenomenological psychological research. The panel was comprised of four former doctoral students of Giorgi’s at Saybrook: Drs. Lisa K. Mastain, Adrienne Murphy, and Sophia Reinders, and was moderated by Marc Applebaum. This transcript was edited by

[continue reading…]

Merleau-Ponty

Ludwig Landgrebe What was it like to study with Husserl?

Philosopher Ludwig Landgrebe (1902-1991) was one of Husserl’s closest assistants. Landgrebe’s description of Husserl below was translated by Algis Mickunas, Professor Emeritus, Ohio University, and included by Lester Embree in his Representation of Edmund Husserl: “Almost everyone who first encountered Husserl experienced something of a disappointment at not immediately seeing any external signs of how

[continue reading…]

Marc Applebaum The Phenomenology of Dreaming: A Dialogue

This conversation between philosopher Susi Ferrarello and me began, as is often the case in phenomenology, with an everyday experience: dreaming. My description of a dream led us to reflect on Merleau-Ponty’s discussions of dreaming and waking perception, and Husserl’s active and passive intentionality. The exchange continued over several weeks, and we’ve summarized it here–

[continue reading…]

friends' shadows Ferrarello: Husserl, Intersubjectivity, and Lifeworld

 Introduction Intersubjectivity can be described as a relationship between me and an other. The peculiarity of this relationship lies in the fact that the other is not alien to me, but is “within me” in a way that his or her “otherness” can be investigated beginning with the way in which that “otherness” is imminent

[continue reading…]

Husserl Key ideas: Applebaum on the phenomenological reduction

I recently posted a short discussion of what “the natural attitude” means in Husserl’s phenomenology. As I mentioned, the natural attitude is the perspective of everyday life. For Husserl the process he calls the phenomenological reduction is the means by which the phenomenologist frees himself from the reifications of the natural attitude, gaining a standpoint

[continue reading…]

Edmund Husserl Applebaum: Introducing Husserl’s phenomenology to psychology students

This PowerPoint presentation was developed for the first meeting of a seminar introducing psychology students to phenomenological psychological research, and assumes no prior knowledge of Husserl or continental philosophy. The descriptive phenomenological research method itself is introduced in depth over the course of the semester–this presentation is a “first taste” of Husserlian terms for students. Naturally, I added

[continue reading…]

Praxis

coke billboard Fads, Phenomenology, and Cultural Psychology

I love Teo and Febbraro’s (2002) observation that “Psychology’s history can be studied as a history of fads” (p. 458). Teo (1996) has written that psychologists “have tended to value meta-theoretical constructions from outside their discipline more than those from inside their disciplines,” with the popularity of these constructions shifting as one or another current

[continue reading…]

Lotus PhenomBlog em Português: Ser um ‘eu’ significa ser ‘único’?

I’m happy to expand the linguistic diversity of our blog with this post of mine in Portuguese, which I offer with deep gratitude to the colleagues who volunteered to translate it: Eu ensino uma introdução à investigação psicológica para estudantes de doutorado que dura um ano. Muitos dos meus alunos são psicoterapeutas ou estão em

[continue reading…]

Chrysochroa_fulgidissima Akihiro Yoshida: Tamamushi-iro-no expressions

Here is a link to a beautiful essay of Akihiro Yoshida’s, On Tamamushi-iro Expression: A Phenomenological Explication of Tamamushi-iro-no (Intendedly Ambiguous) Expressive Acts. Dr. Yoshida is Professor Emeritus of the University of Tokyo, and Professor of Psychology, Shukutoku University. In Japanese, he writes, tamamushi-iro-no expressions are those that, when spoken, lend themselves to multiple differing interpretations by the one to whom they

[continue reading…]

Bird in flight Mohanty on Intentional Acts

Reading J. N. Mohanty’s essay “Husserl’s Concept of Intentionality” in Analecta Husserliana I (1971), the following passage, discussing the Logische Untersuchungen, stood out to me: “The static analysis lays bare the structure of what is called an intentional act whereby the word ‘act’ has to be taken not in its ordinary usage as meaning an activity or a process, but

[continue reading…]

Jack and Jill Broomé: Intentional Analysis in Psychological Research

 Introduction The descriptive phenomenological method of psychological research is rooted in the intentional property of consciousness. Husserl (1983) modified Brentano’s concept of intentionality, expressing it as consciousness acting upon an object or state-of-affairs that is not itself. In other words, embodied human subjectivity relates actively and passively to things that are immanent and external to it

[continue reading…]